Google Poem Search

Sunday, April 11, 2021

POEM OF THE DAY

Serene breeze...
Stoic moon...
Shimmering stars,..
Solemn
Peace...
It's a midsummer
night's dream.

Crushed dreams...
Crumbled
desires...
Crafty
poetry,..
Classic
painting...
It's a midsummer night's dream.

Hefty thoughts...
Hectic
life...
Hilarious
game...
Hissing
anthropoids...
It's a midsummer night's dream.

Achromatic life...
Assimilated
letters...
Assorted
colours...
Assertive
talent...
Anasthetic mind...
It's a midsummer night's dream.

- Priya

Sunday, April 4, 2021

POEM OF THE DAY

She walks in total blissfulness 

You see She seeks nothing 

She wears a peasants coat

Within, She is priceless Jade

She does not display outwardly 

Within She has three treasures 

First, She has Compassion 

Second, She displays Frugality 

Thirdly, She explains that 
one should not put oneself 
first, but rather develop 
the leadership of others 

These Three Treasures 
compliment one another 

It blends other’s energies 
to fit in perfectly with the 
Heavenly Way ~

She walks this because ~

She is Heavenly’s Way~

epc 1956-

Artist-grace g

Grateful thanks to 

Monday, March 15, 2021

Sunday, March 14, 2021

Saturday, March 13, 2021

Friday, March 12, 2021

Thursday, March 11, 2021

Tuesday, March 9, 2021

Friday, January 15, 2021

POEM OF THE DAY : THE GENIUS OF THE CROWD - CHARLES BUKOWSKI

 


CHARLES BUKOWSKI - THE GENIUS OF THE CROWD

41,852 views

•Jul 21, 2011

songsilove16

241 subscribers

SUBSCRIBED

Charles Bukowski reading his poem, The Genius of the Crowd. (1969)

 

Grateful thanks to CHARLES BUKOWSKI, songsilove16 and YouTube and all the others who made this video possible



POEM OF THE DAY - I OPENED A BOOK

Sunday, January 10, 2021

POEM OF THE DAY : SEVEN AGES OF MAN - SHAKESPEARE


SEVEN AGES OF MAN - SHAKESPEARE

(POWERFUL LIFE POETRY)

407,589 views

•Mar 31, 2020

RedFrost Motivation

802K subscribers

SUBSCRIBED

In this drama of life, each one of us plays seven distinct roles. This, Shakespeare says, is the Seven Ages of Man. Music by CHRIS COLEMAN

 

Grateful thanks to RedFrost Motivation, CHRIS COLEMAN and YouTube and all the others who made this video possible


 

Wednesday, December 30, 2020

POEM OF THE DAY : THE RAINY DAY - H. W. LONGFELLOW


THE RAINY DAY - H. W. LONGFELLOW

 (POWERFUL LIFE POETRY)

97,241 views

•Nov 16, 2020

RedFrost Motivation

787K subscribers

Read by Shane Morris - A poem for anyone going through a rough time right now. #poem #poetry #inspirational

 

Grateful thanks to RedFrost Motivation, Shane Morris  and YouTube and all the others who made this video possible 

Tuesday, December 29, 2020

POEM OF THE DAY : OZYMANDIAS - P. B. SHELLEY


OZYMANDIAS - P. B. SHELLEY (POWERFUL LIFE POETRY)

226,716 views

•Apr 11, 2020

RedFrost Motivation

783K subscribers

Read by Vincent Price Music by Slow Meadow - Percy Bysshe Shelley was one of the most highly regarded and influential poets of the 19th century. Shelley's poem “Ozymandias” famously describes a ruined statue of an ancient king in an empty desert. This ambiguous ode carries between its folds heaps of philosophical matters; the poet uses a shattered statue to highlight the ephemeral nature of fame, vanity and power. Nothing lasts forever. Glory, reputation, conquests or occupations, everything will come to an end eventually.

 

Grateful thanks to RedFrost Motivations and YouTube and all the others who made this video possible 

Friday, December 18, 2020

POEM OF THE DAY : TOMORROW, TOMORROW & TOMORROW

“Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow”
BY WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
(from Macbeth, spoken by Macbeth)


Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow,
Creeps in this petty pace from day to day,
To the last syllable of recorded time;
And all our yesterdays have lighted fools
The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle!
Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player,
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage,
And then is heard no more. It is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing.

Wednesday, December 16, 2020

POEM OF THE DAY : THE WILL TO WIN - BERTON BRALEY

THE WILL TO WIN - A POWERFUL LIFE POEM

142,671 views

•Nov 25, 2020


RedFrost Motivation

760K subscribers

 

Read by Shane Morris - The Will to Win by Berton Braley If you want a thing bad enough To go out and fight for it, Work day and night for it, Give up your time and your peace And your sleep for it, If only desire of it Makes you quite mad enough Never to tire of it, Makes you hold all other things tawdry And cheap for it, If life seems all empty and useless without it And all that you scheme And you dream is about it, If gladly you'll sweat for it, Fret for it, Plan for it, Lose all your terror of God or man for it, If you'll simply go after that thing that you want With all your capacity, Strength, and sagacity, Faith, hope, and confidence, stern pertinacity, If neither cold poverty, famished and gaunt, Nor sickness nor pain Of body and brain Can turn you away from the thing that you want, If dogged and grim you besiege and beset it, You'll get it.

 

Grateful thanks to RedFrost Motivation, Shane Morris, Berton Braley and YouTube

 

 


 

Sunday, December 13, 2020

POEM OF THE DAY : ULYSSES - TENNYSON


ULYSSES 
BY ALFRED, LORD TENNYSON


It little profits that an idle king, 
By this still hearth, among these barren crags, 
Match'd with an aged wife, I mete and dole 
Unequal laws unto a savage race, 
That hoard, and sleep, and feed, and know not me. 
I cannot rest from travel: I will drink 
Life to the lees: All times I have enjoy'd 
Greatly, have suffer'd greatly, both with those 
That loved me, and alone, on shore, and when 
Thro' scudding drifts the rainy Hyades 
Vext the dim sea: I am become a name; 
For always roaming with a hungry heart 
Much have I seen and known; cities of men 
And manners, climates, councils, governments,
Myself not least, but honour'd of them all; 
And drunk delight of battle with my peers, 
Far on the ringing plains of windy Troy. 
I am a part of all that I have met; 
Yet all experience is an arch wherethro' 
Gleams that untravell'd world whose margin fades 
For ever and forever when I move. 
How dull it is to pause, to make an end, 
To rust unburnish'd, not to shine in use! 
As tho' to breathe were life! Life piled on life 
Were all too little, and of one to me 
Little remains: but every hour is saved 
From that eternal silence, something more, 
A bringer of new things; and vile it were 
For some three suns to store and hoard myself, 
And this gray spirit yearning in desire 
To follow knowledge like a sinking star, 
Beyond the utmost bound of human thought. 

         This is my son, mine own Telemachus, 
To whom I leave the sceptre and the isle,— 
Well-loved of me, discerning to fulfil 
This labour, by slow prudence to make mild 
A rugged people, and thro' soft degrees 
Subdue them to the useful and the good. 
Most blameless is he, centred in the sphere 
Of common duties, decent not to fail 
In offices of tenderness, and pay 
Meet adoration to my household gods, 
When I am gone. He works his work, I mine. 

         There lies the port; the vessel puffs her sail: 
There gloom the dark, broad seas. My mariners, 
Souls that have toil'd, and wrought, and thought with me— 
That ever with a frolic welcome took 
The thunder and the sunshine, and opposed 
Free hearts, free foreheads—you and I are old; 
Old age hath yet his honour and his toil; 
Death closes all: but something ere the end, 
Some work of noble note, may yet be done, 
Not unbecoming men that strove with Gods. 
The lights begin to twinkle from the rocks: 
The long day wanes: the slow moon climbs: the deep 
Moans round with many voices. Come, my friends, 
'T is not too late to seek a newer world. 
Push off, and sitting well in order smite 
The sounding furrows; for my purpose holds 
To sail beyond the sunset, and the baths 
Of all the western stars, until I die. 
It may be that the gulfs will wash us down: 
It may be we shall touch the Happy Isles, 
And see the great Achilles, whom we knew. 
Tho' much is taken, much abides; and tho' 
We are not now that strength which in old days 
Moved earth and heaven, that which we are, we are; 
One equal temper of heroic hearts, 
Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will 
To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.

Grateful thanks to 

POETRY FOUNDATION.ORG
https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/45392/ulysses


Thursday, December 3, 2020

POEM OF THE DAY : "1ST SEPTEMBER 1939" BY W.H. AUDEN


"1ST SEPTEMBER 1939" BY W.H. AUDEN 

(READ BY TOM O'BEDLAM)

109,473 views•Dec 29, 2008

SpokenVerse

98.4K subscribers

 

On this day Hitler invaded Poland and WWII broke out.  Thucydides was an honest historian, the originator of Political Realism which observes that the relationship between countries is based on strength and not which is in the right. His work is still studied in military academies.

 

Grateful thanks to SpokenVerse, TOM O'BEDLAM and YouTube and all the others who made this video possible